SEEDS OF DOUBT


Title   Cast   Director   Year Shown  Other Info    Country  Notes 


Folgeschäden

Germany, 2005, 88 min

Shown in 2006

CREDITS

dir
Samir Nasr
prod
Martin Bach
scr
Florian Hanig
cam
Bernhard Jasper
editor
Nana Meyer
mus
Oliver Biehler
cast
Silke Bodenbender, Mehdi Nebbou, Mahmoud Alame, Jule Gartzke, Jürgen Hentsch

OTHER

source
Samir Nasr, Winsstrasse 22, D-10405 Berlin, Germany FAX: +49-30-246-379-92. EMAIL: samirnasr@hotmail.com.
gga award
Golden Gate Award—Television Narrative Long Form
premiere
North American Premiere

COMMENTS

Screened with Bing Can Sing. Samir Nasr in attendance.
Seeds of Doubt

Tarik (Mehdi Nebbou), an Algerian scientist living happily in Hamburg with his German wife Maya (Silke Bodenbender) and their young son, responds sarcastically to an anti-Muslim remark made by Maya’s boss at a dinner party. In a post-9/11 world, the retort is all that is needed to spark an official investigation into Tariq’s possible connection with a terrorist cell. The film then follows Maya, who, beginning with her questioning by federal police, travels through a Hitchockian psychological realm, where circumstances seem orchestrated to prove that we can never really know anyone—even the person closest to us. While it propels an edgy, compelling narrative, Maya’s resolution of the truth of whether the man she loves is actually a terrorist is not the central concern of Seeds of Doubt, whose German title, Folgeschäden, translates as “consequential damage.” Set firmly in the turbulent present of subway bombings and anthrax threats, the film is an intensive examination of how insistently the current political climate of fear and suspicion intrudes into Maya’s interpretation of events and corrodes a loving relationship. In keeping with Egyptian/German director Samir Nasr’s desire to “create an atmosphere of complicity between the spectator and the camera,” the film's framing, sound and pacing contribute to a sense that we are tracking Maya—forming our own judgments of Tariq along with her—and perhaps subject to the very same cultural preconceptions and fears.

—Abby Staeble